Art, argument, and grad school

Yup.

20 notes

Gonzo essay on the limits of chip design [2013]

mostlysignssomeportents:

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The term “gonzo journalism” gets thrown around pretty loosely, generally referring to stuff that’s kind of shouty or over-the-top, but really gonzo stuff is completely, totally bananas. Case in point is James Mickens’s The Slow Winter [PDF], a wonderfully lunatic account of the limitations of chip-design that will almost certainly delight you as much as it did me.

Read more…

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[Small transistors] randomly switched states; they leaked voltage; they fell prey to the seductive whims of cosmic rays that, unlike the cosmic rays in comic books, did not turn you into a superhero, but instead made your transistors unreliable and shiftless, like a surly teenager.

Filed under transistors chip design james mickens funny tech cosmic rays quantum mechanics

485 notes

newyorker:

Amy Davidson on Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s retirement dissent:

"Do Democrats want to make sure that a President of their party is in office when Ginsburg leaves the Court? Then win the next election; battle it out, rather than fretting and sighing about how an older woman doesn’t know when it’s time to go.”


Photograph by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty

newyorker:

Amy Davidson on Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s retirement dissent:

"Do Democrats want to make sure that a President of their party is in office when Ginsburg leaves the Court? Then win the next election; battle it out, rather than fretting and sighing about how an older woman doesn’t know when it’s time to go.”

Photograph by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty

8 notes

There is a much larger population of white Americans, I believe, who feel troubled by what they saw in Ferguson but are unable or unwilling to face the fact that it reflects a recurring historical pattern that has obviously not been exorcised, a pattern of power, privilege and domination in which they are complicit.
Andrew O’Hehir (via blherrou)

Filed under ferguson racism white people

72 notes

Love of Shopping is Not a Gene: exposing junk science and ideology in Darwinian Psychology

mostlysignssomeportents:

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Anne Innis Dagg’s "Love of Shopping" is Not a Gene is a scathing, entertaining and extremely accessible geneticist’s critique of “Darwinian Psychology” — that is, the “science” of ascribing human behavior to genetic inevitability. Dagg, a biologist/geneticist at the University of Waterloo,…

Filed under darwinian psychology evolutionary psych anne innis dagg bah bahfest

102 notes

Did people jump from the WTC towers on 9/11 because their rooms were on fire and they were about to be burned alive?

youmightfindyourself:

By: Catherine Beale, Quora

It was too hot.  

If you had been listening to the harrowing telephone messages left by the people who were trapped, with no way out, who made one last phone call to say goodbye — and no one answered — you would have heard them explain what they were about to do.
 
Some held hands with colleagues.  Some wrapped their arms around people they worked with, and they stepped together into the empty air.  Some went alone.  No one understood the fire.  No one understood why no one had come to save them. 
 
Their last words were unforgettable.  Their voices.  Their deep regret.  How calm some almost seemed.  One young guy left a message for his brother: I’m sorry we fought; I love you.
 
One left a message for his mother.  I love you, mom.  I’m sorry.
 
I don’t think anyone understood what was happening — a plane, an explosion, why they were left there, and could not be saved.  

Then for weeks, the recordings were played on the radio during New York City’s news coverage.
 
I had a friend who thought this public use of intimate, personal farewell messages was obscene.  I disagreed.  The tragedy of losing thousands of people so quickly in a single morning could be impersonally arms length, but for those voices.  
 
If desk phones weren’t working, they used cellphones.  The towers were built originally with helicopter landings.  Many had expected, of course, to be lifted off the roof.  There was no other way to get out.  Slowly, they began to realize it would soon be over.  They started to jump.  “I have to go,” said one, and hung up.
 
The towers hadn’t fallen yet.  No one knew that was going to happen.  This is why so many people died.

At the base, office workers from buildings on Broadway and Liberty and Chase Manhattan Plaza walked over and stood at the bottom and watched as people dropped in front of them.
 
I had a colleague named Tom whose young cousin worked in one tower.  He prayed she would appear, safe.  He walked over and stood next to a man who counted out loud each body as it hit the pavement.  26.  27.  28.  “It was so weird.”  She was never found.
 
For months, photos of the “Missing” were taped to walls by the people who loved them, all around Penn Station, on telephone poles, on the sides of buildings, lamp posts, pillars.  Every surface of New York was covered with these color xeroxes.  No one took them down.


Why did they jump?

There, on the roof, they waited as long as they could, until it was unbearably hot, and they simply could not stay there anymore.  They apologized for dying, said goodbye, and went.

Filed under 9/11 feels

48 notes

theleagueofmoveabletype:


We’re super excited to introduce a new member to our catalogue – League Spartan. We’ve been working on this one a while, and we’re starting out by releasing a single, bold weight. It’s a beautiful, modern geometric sans-serif, and we’ve actually been secretly using it on our own site for the last few months. It’s superb. You’ll love it.

theleagueofmoveabletype:

We’re super excited to introduce a new member to our catalogue – League Spartan. We’ve been working on this one a while, and we’re starting out by releasing a single, bold weight. It’s a beautiful, modern geometric sans-serif, and we’ve actually been secretly using it on our own site for the last few months. It’s superb. You’ll love it.

Filed under very excited just what I've always wanted league spartan league of movable type

5,083 notes

archatlas:

Åkrafjorden Snøhetta

"The hunting lodge is beautifully situated, alone beside a lake in the untouched mountain areas close to Åkrafjorden in the western part of Norway. It is accessible only by foot or horseback. The integration of the hut into the landscape has been an important part of the concept. The terrain is characteristic with grass, heather and rocks, and the hut’s shape, orientation, and materials are dictated by this. “

(via othernotebooksareavailable)

Filed under photography architecture beauty aesthetics